Voices for Change

Voices for Change, V4C (Nigeria, 2013-2017) was a program which worked to strengthen the enabling environment for gender equality in Nigeria. The program targeted young women and men aged 16–25 years old and operated in four states in Nigeria: Enugu, Kaduna, Kano and Lagos. For some activities it operated at the federal level.

V4C is a unique example of a program applying social norms theory at scale and addressed the structural barriers to gender equality. In particular, it addressed discriminatory and harmful attitudes, behaviors and social norms. The three normative areas that V4C sought to change were women’s voice and leadership, women’s role in decision-making and violence against women and girls.

V4C was distinct from many other programs aiming to transform gender norms in placing communications and social marketing at its heart. A key reason for using a social marketing approach was to bring about change at scale.

The components of the approach to shifting discriminatory gender norms using social marketing were as follows:

  • Create a youth-focused brand: this allows you to talk to your audience in their own language, using music, fashion and media which appeal to them.
  • Place the audience at the center: it is essential to understand the lifestyles, aspirations and attitudes towards gender equality among your audience.
  • Promote the message in an attractive way: identify how gender equal behavior will benefit your audience and place these benefits at the heart of your communications. V4C promotes gender equality using messages around self-fulfilment, romantic relationships and career success, as well as human rights.
  • Use an integrated marketing strategy: make use of the full range of marketing tools to engage your audience.
  • Measure impact: ensure you have robust monitoring and evaluation systems including baseline and endline surveys to evaluate the effectiveness of your communications

Source: Voices for Change

Date of Publication: November 2, 2021

Real-Time Monitoring of Rural Sanitation at Scale in Zambia Using Mobile-to-Web Technologies

This brief describes an innovative Mobile-to-Web (M2W) real-time monitoring system used in Zambia in 2013-2014.

The effective rollout of M2W in rural Zambia has demonstrated how a mobile system combined with simple protocols for reporting and analysis has the potential for nation-wide monitoring of open, defecation-free (ODF) water supplies. The M2W system was developed in 2013 for monitoring rural sanitation and hygiene by UNICEF and its technical partner Akros, under the lead of the Ministry of Local Government and Housing of Zambia. The system utilizes the Short Message Service (SMS) text delivery system found on most basic mobile phones and is coded using the open source District Health Information Software 2 (DHIS 2). This is a free, open-source software originally designed for health applications, but is currently being used in 40 countries under various sectors, from water management to agriculture and forestry.

The M2W system demonstrated how a mobile system combined with simple protocols for reporting and analysis has the potential for nationwide monitoring of ODF.

Source: UNICEF

Date of Publication: September 30, 2021

Hygiene Behaviour Change Coalition Case Study

This case study, presented as an interview with the project coordinator, describes the development, implementation and impact of using murals as tools for social and behavior change.

The program intervention embraced the use of art as a powerful tool in touching and reaching everyone to promote and trigger key COVID-19 prevention behaviors.

All artistic creation and production processes were led by and in collaboration with the target communities. Sixty-five murals were painted by local artists in an interactive and partially improvisatory way with the goal of being relatable, locally-relevant, and easy for a large and diverse audience to engage with.

Each mural visually depicts one of the main COVID-19 preventive behaviors (i.e. handwashing with soap, face mask wearing and physical distancing) or other relevant hygiene behaviors, in alignment with the broader ‘PASSWORD’ campaign in Kenya.

Source: AMREF

Date of Publication: August 18, 2021

Stories from the Forefront: Interviews with Social and Behaviour Change Communications Media Professionals

USAID’s Feed the Future EatSafe – Evidence and Action Toward Safe, Nutritious Food (EatSafe) tests whether the consumer and their behaviors and actions can shape informal markets to adopt better food safety behaviors. The EatSafe project will use a variety of media-based SBCC interventions to reach market vendors and consumers to help change attitudes and behaviors around food safety.

This report presents stories from top practitioners in the field of SBC media worldwide – including executive directors, country directors, producers, and researchers – in order to uncover the nuances of program development that can guide more effective EatSafe SBC media productions and help implement more sustainable programs.

At the conclusion of interviews with six SBC professionals, two broad themes emerge that have practical implications for the design of EatSafe SBC media interventions.

Source: Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN), USAID, Pierce Mill Media, Weinreich Communications

Date of Publication: August 12, 2021

African Transformation Written Profiles

African Transformation is a participatory tool that enables men and women to examine critically gender and social norms, including masculinity, and how they affect their well-being; to overcome gender barriers in their own life: and to work on eliminating harmful gender norms and supporting positive ones. “African Transformation” is an adaptation of the successful “Arab Women Speak Out” (AWSO) model to the African context.

The key component of AWSO is a series of video profiles showing positive role models of women from relatively low socio-economic status who overcame gender barriers and reached goals they had determined for themselves. The profiles are shown during a participatory, facilitative training, whereby participants review these women’s stories, and explore resources and strategies they can use to attain their own goals. The guide has been designed to help people explore thoughts, ideas, and behaviors and make positive changes in their lives using a technique called “participatory learning.”

Participatory learning uses facilitation to encourage people to actively participate in their own learning. The role of the facilitator is key to the success of the program and to enabling participants to use their own experiences and knowledge as a basis for solving problems. The guide should be used along with the video, audio, and written profiles. The profiles, as well as the discussions, role-plays, small and large group discussions, in the individual sessions help participants analyze their experiences, learn new information, improve their skills of interaction and understand and identify opportunities for change.

Source: Johns Hopkins University Center for Communication Programs

Date of Publication: August 5, 2021

Arab Women Speak Out: Profiles of Self Empowerment

Arab Women Speak Out™ was conceived in 1999 as an innovative documentary, training, and advocacy project designed to promote women’s empowerment and active participation in social development throughout the Near East.The project features print and video profiles of women in Egypt, Lebanon, Palestine, Tunisia, and Yemen who are perceived and respected as innovators within their communities. The primary purpose of the Arab Women Speak Out™ project is to share these women’s experiences and skills with their peers throughout the Arab region, as well as with development workers, health providers, community leaders, policy-makers, donors, and interested others. The campaign includes videos, a training module, and these profiles.

Nearly 30,000 women were reached in the governorate of Irbid through a unique two-tiered approach of AWSOmessage dissemination. 98% of AWSOParticipants reported that they had benefitted from participating in AWSO, in the form of increased self-confidence (43%); improved relationships with their spouse (32%), their families (29%), and their communities (23%); engaging in discussions about family planning with relatives (21%) as well as with friends and neighbors (23%); and speaking with someone about FP as a direct result of participation (44%).

Source: Johns Hopkins University Center for Communication Programs, The Center of Arab Women for Training and Research

Date of Publication: July 26, 2021

Malaria Social and Behaviour Change during COVID-19 Case Study: The Call of the Trumpet, Ethiopia

The COVID-19 pandemic has wreaked havoc on malaria control and elimination efforts. Modeling predictions suggested the annual malaria death toll in sub-Saharan Africa could double because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The World Health Organization (WHO) urged countries not to scale back their planned malaria prevention, diagnostic, and treatment activities during the COVID-19 pandemic or the gains made in saving lives from malaria and other diseases over the past 20 years may be lost.

Malaria SBC programs had to think afresh and re-strategize to tackle new limitations to reach audiences and convince them to change their behaviors to prevent and manage malaria. Malaria SBC workers increased their efforts while also closely following COVID-19 guidelines.

This Ethiopia case study offers insight into leveraging community members’ existing social capital to reinforce insecticide-treated net use and prompt care-seeking for fever during COVID-19. They literally blew trumpets to drive home their messages.

Source: RBM Partnership to End Malaria Social and Behavior Change Working Group

Date of Publication: July 15, 2021

Malaria Social and Behaviour Change during COVID-19 Case Study: Inside the Jungle, Cambodia

The COVID-19 pandemic has wreaked havoc on malaria control and elimination efforts. Modeling predictions suggested the annual malaria death toll in sub-Saharan Africa could double because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The World Health Organization (WHO) urged countries not to scale back their planned malaria prevention, diagnostic, and treatment activities during the COVID-19 pandemic or the gains made in saving lives from malaria and other diseases over the past 20 years may be lost.

Malaria SBC programs had to think afresh and re-strategize to tackle new limitations to reach audiences and convince them to change their behaviors to prevent and manage malaria. Malaria SBC workers increased their efforts while also closely following COVID-19 guidelines.

The Cambodia case study reveals the benefits of long-term investments in community structures and the importance of local ownership and SBC capacity to reach the country’s hardest-to-reach communities.

Source: RBM Partnership to End Malaria Social and Behavior Change Working Group

Date of Publication: July 15, 2021

Malaria Social and Behaviour Change during COVID-19 Case Study: The Mobile Classroom, Nigeria

The COVID-19 pandemic has wreaked havoc on malaria control and elimination efforts. Modeling predictions suggested the annual malaria death toll in sub-Saharan Africa could double because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The World Health Organization (WHO) urged countries not to scale back their planned malaria prevention, diagnostic, and treatment activities during the COVID-19 pandemic or the gains made in saving lives from malaria and other diseases over the past 20 years may be lost.

Malaria SBC programs had to think afresh and re-strategize to tackle new limitations to reach audiences and convince them to change their behaviors to prevent and manage malaria. Malaria SBC workers increased their efforts while also closely following COVID-19 guidelines.

This case study from Nigeria showcases the ability to innovate and build the SBC capacity of field staff with limited resources. It demonstrates that even simple technologies like interactive voice response can provide practical solutions during a crisis.

Source: RBM Partnership to End Malaria Social and Behavior Change Working Group

Date of Publication: July 15, 2021

Engaging Girls with Kuwa Mjanja

This presentation offers an overview of the Kuwa Mjanja campaign in Tanzania, managed by FHI360, which delivers entrepreneurial skills and contraceptive counseling sessions— tailored to and branded for the unique needs of girls. Across disciplines and in partnership with girls, Kuwa Mjanja supports girls aged 15-19 to explore the role contraception plays in helping them achieve their life dreams.

The key program elements were:

  • Branding
  • Messaging
  • Demand Creation
  • Sustained Engagement
  • Learning Experiences
  • Girl-centered Service Delivery

Source: FHI360

Date of Publication: June 29, 2021