RBM Partnership to End Malaria Social and Behaviour Change Working Group: School-Based Malaria SBC Resources

This collection of school-based malaria SBC resources, shared by SBC WG members includes board games, teacher’s guides, comic books, and more, for fellow members to learn from and utilize in their work. The resources, shared during the RBM Partnership to End Malaria Social and Behavior Change Working Group (SBC WG) General Call, held on May 16, 2024, focused on school-based malaria SBC. This General Call focused on malaria SBC in schools in Nigeria and Madagascar. The session recordings and presentation slides are available online.

Tanzania

Burundi

To share additional resources or ask questions, please email Ashley Riley, SBC WG Coordinator.

Source: RBM Partnership to End Malaria Social and Behaviour Change Working Group

Date of Publication: May 30, 2024

Go Nisha Go

Go Nisha Go is the Game of Choice not Chance first mobile game co-created with adolescent girls, ages 15-19, in Hindi-speaking regions in India. It is designed to increase girls’ reproductive health knowledge and decision-making confidence, thus empowering them to make informed choices, develop strong voices, and become better equipped to realize their full potential.

The game was designed through co-design approaches and formative research and it has a focus on reproductive health topics such as menstruation, fertility awareness, contraception, consent, prioritizing education/careers, and delaying marriage. Its content is based on the themes identified through the co-design research with girls. These themes include identity, ambition, safety, self-image, relationships, and technology access. Funded by USAID and powered by Howard Delafield International, the game integrates direct-to-consumer resources, products, and services for adolescent girls.

Source: Howard Delafield International

Date of Publication: October 19, 2023

Games people play: An innovative method for enhancing child health behaviors

Behavior change requires interaction, innovation, and iteration to create a supportive social environment for engaging communities to bring about positive health outcomes. We used The CINI method© – a multisectoral human rights-based approach for behavior change that draws on human-centered design along with the socio-ecological model. With this unique combination of approaches, our team co-created community games to drive sustainable behavior change to facilitate improvements in child health. We built on the lessons grounded in The CINI Method© to design a novel approach to engage stakeholders in co-creating community games to address child health. Community games aimed to promote change in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors and encourage participants to be reflective about their roles and responsibilities towards ensuring healthy children. These games exposed participants to real-life situations in an engaging, yet entertaining manner. To augment our learning, we conducted informal post-game interviews to capture participants’ experiences and reflections of each game. We outline the methodology of developing community games as a child-centered approach grounded in the principles of social and behavior change communication.

Objectives:
With an objective to drive sustainable behavior change at the multisectoral level to facilitate improvements in child health, we made a short film capturing a novel approach to engage stakeholders in co-creating community games to address child health. Accompanying the short film is a write-up about the methodology behind co-creating the games with a multisectoral human rights-based approach for behavior change that draws on human-centered design along with the socio-ecological model.

Behaviors being addressed:

  1. Improving the role and accountability of multisectoral stakeholders in creating a safety net to improve maternal health to support healthy birth outcomes
  2. Improving the uptake of childhood immunization
  3. Reducing early marriage and teenage pregnancy

Current behaviors:

  1. Multisectoral key stakeholders don’t feel and act responsible towards improving maternal health to support healthy birth outcome
  2. Low uptake of childhood immunization
  3. Early marriage and teenage pregnancy

Source: Johns Hopkins Maternal and Child Health Center India

Date of Publication: October 12, 2023

Super Better

SuperBetter uses gameplay psychology to help users build skills, overcome obstacles, and achieve goals. Studies have shown its benefit in improving mental health and resilience.

Source: SuperBetter

Date of Publication: August 22, 2022

A Web-Based Game for Young Adolescents to Improve Parental Communication and Prevent Unintended Pregnancy and Sexually Transmitted Infections (The Secret of Seven Stones): Development and Feasibility Study

This paper describes the development of a web-based online sexual health intergenerational adventure game, the Secret of Seven Stones (SSS), using an intervention mapping approach for developing theory and evidence-based interventions.

SSS is an adventure game which provides sexual health skills training for young adolescents and promotes adolescent-parent communication.

Source: JMIR Serious Games

Date of Publication: August 17, 2022

Mission 1.5 Game

Mission 1.5 uses mobile gaming technology to educate people about climate solutions and get their participation in voting on which solutions they want to see happen.

Votes per country are collated and presented to country governments to encourage bolder climate action.

Source: United Nations Development Programme

Date of Publication: August 16, 2022

Me and My Coral Reef Game

SeKarang! was a campaign in Indonesia (1999-2002) combining mass media and community-based approaches to promote marine resource management and specifically to save the coral reefs of the country. The stated goal of the project was To protect, rehabilitate and achieve sustainable use of coral reefs and associated ecosystems in Indonesia, in order to enhance the welfare of coastal communities. The communication component of the campaign focused on educating the public on the how and why of coral reef protection and on creating political pressure & support.

The campaign included videos, radio spots, workshops for journalists, and other communication products. Evaluation showed that the higher the exposure to the campaign’s communication activities/materials, the larger the impact on knowledge, attitudes, motivations, and involvement in coral reef management efforts. Also, an increase in the reported use of relatively reef-friendly techniques appeared to be related to campaign exposure.

– See more at: http://stg.thehealthcompass.org/project-examples/terumbu-karang-tinggal-…

SeKarang! was a campaign in Indonesia (1999-2002) combining mass media and community-based approaches to promote marine resource management and specifically to save the coral reefs of the country. The stated goal of the project was To protect, rehabilitate and achieve sustainable use of coral reefs and associated ecosystems in Indonesia, in order to enhance the welfare of coastal communities. The communication component of the campaign focused on educating the public on the how and why of coral reef protection and on creating political pressure & support.

The campaign included videos, radio spots, workshops for journalists, and other communication products. Evaluation showed that the higher the exposure to the campaign’s communication activities/materials, the larger the impact on knowledge, attitudes, motivations, and involvement in coral reef management efforts. Also, an increase in the reported use of relatively reef-friendly techniques appeared to be related to campaign exposure.

The objective of this game is to educate school children in an interactive manner about the creatures of the coral reef, threats toward the coral reef and the protective actions toward the coral reef. The game was received with high enthusiasm by school children, school teachers, parents, and government authorities.

Source: Johns Hopkins University Center for Communicaiton Programs, Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI)

Date of Publication: August 2, 2021

Suaahara Nepal Project

Suaahara was an integrated nutrition project (2011-2016) that worked in 41 underserved districts in Nepal to improve the health and well-being of the Nepali people by focusing on the nutritional status of women and children under the age of two years. CCP partnered with Save the Children; Helen Keller International; Jhpiego; Nepali Technical Assistance Group; Nepal Water for Health; and the Nutrition Promotion and Consultancy Service.

Suaahara means good nutrition, or “a good balanced diet is the strong foundation protecting our lives.” As part of the implementing team, CCP supported strategic social and behavior change communication initiatives that build on this message and model behavior change to lead to improved maternal, infant and child nutrition.

In close coordination with Nepal government, the team created Bhanchhin Aama (Mother knows best), which served as the basis for a campaign for mass and community media. Bhanchhin Aama is a trusted, knowledgeable friendly mother-in-law character who models and promotes positive behavior change.

Project products included:

Source: Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs

Date of Publication: June 29, 2021

Go Viral!

GO VIRAL! is a 5-minute game that helps protect the public against COVID-19 misinformation.

The players learn about some of the most common strategies used to spread false and misleading information about the virus. Understanding these tricks allows the public to resist them the next time they come across them online.

Source: Social Decision Making Lab, University of Cambridge

Date of Publication: May 3, 2021

Outil de formation financiere

This interactive exercise helps youth estimate the expenses needed to support a family and realize how a larger number of children has an impact in the financial burden for the family. Young men participating in this exercise usually express the desire of a smaller number of children after having performed the exercise.

Source: Population Services International

Date of Publication: February 22, 2021