Project m-Maitri: Interactive Voice Response (IVR) for Parent-to-Child Transmission

In 2016, Solidarity and Action Against the HIV Infection in India began a partnership with Janssen Global Public Health, an initiative of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson. The initiative, named m-Maitri, aimed to complement on-the-ground efforts at ensuring retention in the prevention of parent-to-child transmission cascade with interactive voice response (IVR) to consenting pregnant women and mother-baby pairs until the babies reach 18 months of age.

Messages commence in the antenatal period and until 18 months post-delivery. The service delivers customized messaging relevant to the woman’s stage of pregnancy and her infant’s development, and covers issues such as nutrition for mother and child, immunization, infections such as HIV, TB and malaria, anti-retroviral prophylaxis and treatment, safe delivery, early infant diagnosis and retention in care, and many other health behaviors. SAATHII’s technology partner in this initiative is Mahiti, and IVRS partner is IMIMobile.

A case study reveals more details about the program.

Source: SAATHI

Date of Publication: November 5, 2021

Addressing Rumors or Myths and Role in Vaccine Safety Events

This video is part of a package of materials, including other short videos, for health workers, called Interpersonal Communication for Immunization.

The video tells a story about an immunization program which has been going well until a rumor begins that one child in a community far from the capital has become sick after receiving a vaccine. The rumor becomes stronger every day and there is concern that the rumor might make parents concerned about bringing their children for vaccination. Frontline workers (FLWs) go to the house of the sick children and find out from the child’s mother that she never thought her son was sick due to the vaccination he received. The mother agrees to speak to others during a community gathering to explain that her son’s illness was not caused by his vaccination. She also responds to a few questions to reassure other caregivers about the safety and advantages of immunization.

Source: UNICEF

Date of Publication: September 30, 2021

Investing in Social and Behavior Change is Cost-effective for Improving Malaria Behaviors in Côte d’Ivoire

Social and behavior change (SBC) programming is considered an essential part of malaria prevention and treatment interventions, yet gaps in information on the cost and impact of SBC mean that decision-makers have underappreciated the value of SBC for contributing to improved health outcomes.

To address this issue, Breakthrough RESEARCH has leveraged evidence from 112 studies on the impact of SBC interventions on malaria health behaviors and 70 studies on general SBC intervention costs to model the cost-effectiveness of SBC programming for malaria in the Business Case for Investing in Social and Behavior Change for Malaria.

The Breakthrough RESEARCH malaria business case modeled the cost-effectiveness of malaria SBC for malaria-related health behaviors in Côte d’Ivoire by combining the evidence on cost and effectiveness of SBC for malaria-related health behaviors with country-specific data on the current context and an estimated five-year investment scenario based on national planning and implementation reports.

SBC interventions aim to improve the use of insecticide-treated bed nets and care seeking for fever and treatment adherence. In Côte d’Ivoire, interventions include mass media, interpersonal communication, and SBC packages, including community engagement.

For more information, contact Nicole Bellows, NBellows@avenirhealth.org

Source: Avenir Health

Date of Publication: September 19, 2021

Investing in Social and Behavior Change is Cost-effective for Improving Malaria Behaviors in Tanzania

Social and behavior change (SBC) programming is considered an essential part of malaria prevention and treatment interventions, yet gaps in information on the cost and impact of SBC mean decision-makers have underappreciated the value of SBC for contributing to improved health outcomes.

To address this issue, Breakthrough RESEARCH has leveraged evidence from 112 studies on the impact of SBC interventions on malaria health behaviors and 70 studies on general SBC intervention costs to model the cost-effectiveness of SBC programming for malaria in the Business Case for Investing in Social and Behavior Change for Malaria.

The Breakthrough RESEARCH malaria business case modeled the cost-effectiveness of malaria SBC for malaria-related health behaviors in Tanzania by combining the evidence on cost and effectiveness of SBC for malaria-related health behaviors with country-specific data on the current context and an estimated five-year investment scenario based on national planning and implementation reports.

SBC interventions aim to improve the use of insecticide-treated bed nets and care seeking for fever and treatment adherence. In Tanzania, an integrated SBC program includes mass media campaigns, interpersonal communication, community events, and text message reminders related to malaria treatment.

For more information, contact Nicole Bellows, NBellows@avenirhealth.org

Source: Avenir Health

Date of Publication: September 19, 2021

Using Social Listening to Inform Integrated Social and Behavior Change Programs in Burkina Faso

Breakthrough RESEARCH, in collaboration with resource partner M&C Saatchi, is using social listening as a research strategy to understand the types of health information shared through social media in Francophone West Africa.

Social listening is the process of tracking and analyzing conversation content and related metrics for a particular topic on social media. For social and behavior change (SBC) programs, social listening can be an important tool for better understanding people’s beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors. Social listening research analyzes the content and sentiment behind messages—including misinformation—and uses that information to inform program design and adaptive management.

Using social listening to Inform Integrated SBC programs in Burkina Faso shares findings specific to Burkina Faso and discusses how this information can be used to inform integrated SBC activities in RISE II program countries.

For more information, contact Leanne Dougherty, ldougherty@popcouncil.org

Source: Population Council/Breakthrough RESEARCH

Date of Publication: September 19, 2021

Kids against Malaria Videos

Kids Against Malaria uses music and film to reach out to the global population at risk from malaria. The project was inspired by a song written with students at the International Center of Art and Music at Ouidah (CIAMO) of Art & Music in Benin.

The song, a triumphant call to defeat malaria, motivated CIAMO cofounder Sarah duPont and filmmaker/musician Jon Fine to engage UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador and 3 time Grammy winner Angélique Kidjo in the project. Together, they conceived a transmedia project for radio, TV and online to amplify the message of the song.

Kids Against Malaria was designed to cover a wide range of information about how malaria is transmitted and how to ensure protection. More than 50 people were involved in creating the project and over 100 students participated from CIAMO school of Art and music. Renowned musicians including CIAMO’s executive director Oscar Kidjo, Antibalas, Logozo, Gangbe Brass Band and filmmakers from the ISMA Film Program in Benin joined in alongside Kidjo and the students to make it a success.

Source: Kids Against Malaria

Date of Publication: August 16, 2021

Malaria and COVID-19 Television Spot – Kenya

Breakthrough ACTION worked with the Kenyan Division of the National Malaria Programme to develop this spot that promotes malaria prevention, testing, and treatment.

The spot also reassures audiences that it is safe to go to the health facility during the COVID-19 pandemic thanks to safety precautions put in place. The spot has been broadcast regularly on four of the leading local TV stations in Kenya starting in January 2021.

Source: Breakthrough ACTION/Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs

Date of Publication: July 13, 2021

Masked Indian Comic Superhero Fights COVID-19 Fear

India’s first female comic superhero Priya, a gang-rape survivor who earlier campaigned against rape, acid attack and sex trafficking, is back to fight disinformation around the Covid-19 pandemic.

In Priya’s Mask, due to be launched on 2 December, the comic crusader joins hands with Jiya, the “Burka Avenger”, a popular character from a Pakistani cartoon show, as the two go about trying to tackle the pandemic – and also the “infodemic”, a major proliferation in fake news surrounding the coronavirus.

With more than 9.4 million infections and 137,000 deaths, India has the second highest caseload globally. A strict nationwide lockdown that was imposed on 21 March delayed the spread for a while, but infections grew rapidly – and continue to do so – since restrictions were relaxed.

A major challenge in India’s fight against Covid-19 has been the false and misleading information around the pandemic, which is often shared quickly. Through this campaign, the creators wanted to challenge misinformation, dispel fear, and support the health workers and others at the forefront of the fight against the virus.

Source: Priyashakti

Date of Publication: December 7, 2020

Play Your Part To Prevent COVID-19 Through Physical Distance

This video was developed for Eswati audiences in Siswati with English subtitles . Drawing on beneficiary feedback regarding challenges to physical distancing, the different speakers outline reasons why physical distancing is important, and how to apply it to situations faced in everyday life.

Source: Breakthrough ACTION/Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs

Date of Publication: October 21, 2020